Some Things we Discourage

1. No political/religious discussions on company time . Today's social and political waters are especially choppy. Sensitivities are at 11, and every discussion remotely related to politics, advocacy, or society at large quickly spins away from pleasant. You shouldn't have to wonder if staying out of it means you're complicit, or wading into it means you're a target. These are difficult enough waters to navigate in life, but significantly more so at work. It saps our energy, and redirects our dialog towards dark places. It's not healthy, it hasn't served us well to build bonds and friendship and a caring, inclusive environment.

2. No more paternalistic benefits. 

For years we've offered a fitness benefit, a wellness allowance and continuing education allowance. They felt good at the time, but we've had a change of heart. It's none of our business what you do outside of work, and it's not Intempt's place to encourage certain behaviors — regardless of good intention. By providing funds for certain things, we're getting too deep into nudging people's personal, individual choices. In addition, we recently introduced a 50% profit sharing plan to provide direct compensation that people can spend on whatever they'd like, privately, without company involvement or judgement.

3. No committees. No big working groups making big decisions, or putting forward formalized, groupthink recommendations. No bureaucracy. We're turning things back over to the person (or people) who were distinctly hired to make those decisions. When we need advice or counsel we'll ask individuals with direct relevant experience rather than a pre-defined group at large. Stick to basics, back to individual responsibility.

4. No 360 reviews. Employee performance reviews need  to be straightforward. A meeting with your manager or team lead, direct feedback, and recommendations for improvement. No 360s, which required peers to provide feedback on peers. The problem is, peer feedback is often positive and reassuring, which is fun to read but not very useful. Assigning peer surveys started to feel like assigning busy work. Manager/employee feedback should be flowing pretty freely back and forth throughout the year. No need to add performative paperwork on top of that natural interaction. So no 360s.

6. No forgetting what we do here. We make marketing and data software. We are not a social impact company. Our impact is contained to what we do and how we do it. We write software, we blog, we speak, we open source software, we give back software to our industry. And we're damn proud of it. Our work, plus that kind of giving, should occupy our full attention. We cannot solve  social problems or get behind one movement or another with time or money. These are all important topics — and they're also not what we collectively do here. Employees are free and encouraged to take up whatever cause they want, support whatever movements they'd like, and speak out on injustices are being perpetrated. The founders will speak up as individuals but the company will remain neutral.